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Model-based engineering for complex electronic systems [recurso electrónico] : techniques, methods and applications / by Peter Wilson, H. Alan Mantooth.

Por: Wilson, Peter R. (Peter Reid).
Colaborador(es): Mantooth, H. Alan, 1963-.
Tipo de material: materialTypeLabelLibroEditor: Oxford : Newnes, 2012Descripción: 1 online resource : ill.Tipo de contenido: text Tipo de medio: computer Tipo de portador: online resourceISBN: 9780123850867 (electronic bk.); 012385086X (electronic bk.); 9781299364516 (MyiLibrary); 1299364519 (MyiLibrary).Tema(s): Systems on a chip -- Computer simulation | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING / Electronics / Circuits / General | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING / Electronics / Circuits / IntegratedGénero/Forma: Electronic books.Formatos físicos adicionales: Print version:: Model-based engineering for complex electronic systems.Clasificación CDD: 621.38150113 Recursos en línea: Libro electrónico ScienceDirect
Contenidos:
Machine generated contents note: SECTION 1 Fundamentals for Model-Based Engineering -- ch. 1 Overview of Model-Based Engineering -- 1.1.Introduction -- 1.2.Multiple Facets of Modeling -- 1.3.Hierarchical Design -- 1.4.Partitioning -- 1.5.Specifications -- 1.6.Keys and Barriers to Adoption of Model-Based Engineering -- Conclusions -- ch. 2 The Design and Verification Process -- 2.1.Introduction to the Design Process -- 2.2.Validation, Verification, and Requirements -- 2.3.The Design and Verification Process -- 2.4.System/Functional Level: Executable Specification -- 2.5.Architectural Level -- 2.6.Implementation Level -- 2.7.Model-Based Engineering -- A Winning Approach -- ch. 3 Design Analysis -- 3.1.Introduction -- 3.2.Manual Analysis -- 3.2.1.Hand Calculations -- 3.2.2.Emulation, Experimentation, and Prototyping -- 3.3.Computer Simulation -- 3.3.1.Simulation Algorithms -- 3.3.4.Practical Issues -- Summary -- Conclusion -- References and Further Reading -- ch. 4 Modeling of Systems -- 4.1.Modeling in the Context of Design -- 4.2.Modeling Hierarchy -- 4.2.1.Hierarchy Concepts -- 4.2.2.Partitioning -- 4.3.Fundamentals of Modeling -- 4.3.1.Definition of a Model -- 4.3.2.Representing Model Variables -- 4.3.3.Representing Model Behavior -- 4.3.4.Representing Model Structure -- 4.3.5.Analog Connections -- 4.3.6.Discrete Connections -- 4.3.7.Generic Versus Component Models -- 4.3.8.Models and Effects -- 4.3.9.Conservation of Energy -- 4.3.10.Branches -- 4.4.Specific Modeling Techniques -- 4.4.1.Introduction -- 4.4.2.Behavioral Modeling Using HDLs -- 4.4.3.Behavioral Modeling Using Macromodeling -- 4.4.4.Structure in Behavioral Modeling -- 4.4.5.Signal Flow Models -- 4.4.6.Analog Conserved Models -- 4.4.7.Discrete Models -- 4.4.8.Event-Based Models -- 4.4.9.Mixed-Signal Boundaries -- 4.5.Forms of Representation -- 4.5.1.HDLs -- 4.5.2.C and System-C -- 4.5.3.System Level Modeling: Matlab -- 4.5.4.System Level Modeling: UML -- 4.6.Modeling Tools -- 4.6.1.Bottom-Up Tools -- 4.6.2.Top-Down Modeling Tools -- 4.6.3.Graphical Modeling -- 4.7.Future Proofing -- 4.7.1.Common Frameworks -- 4.7.2.Libraries -- 4.7.3.Standards -- 4.7.4.Language Independence -- 4.7.5.Graphical Representation -- Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- SECTION 2 Modeling Approaches -- ch. 5 Graphical Modeling -- 5.1.Introduction -- 5.2.Modeling on Top of Languages -- 5.3.Model Abstraction -- 5.4.Getting started with ModLyng -- 5.5.Creating a Simple Model -- 5.6.Libraries and Models -- 5.7.Effects and Models -- 5.8.Hierarchical Models -- Using the Schematic Editor -- 5.9.Test Benches and Model Validation -- 5.10.Examples -- 5.1.1.Example 5.1 -- 5.1.2.Example 5.2 -- Conclusion -- Appendix -- Reference -- Further Reading -- ch. 6 Block Diagram Modeling and System Analysis -- 6.1.Introduction -- 6.2.Signal Flow Modeling -- 6.3.State Machines -- 6.3.1.Finite State Machines -- 6.3.2.State Transition Diagrams -- 6.3.3.Algorithmic State Machines -- 6.4.Algorithmic Models -- 6.4.1.Introduction -- 6.4.2.System-C -- 6.5.Transfer Function Modeling -- 6.5.1.Introduction -- 6.5.2.Transfer Function Modeling Example -- 6.5.3.State Space Modeling -- Conclusion -- ch. 7 Multiple Domain Modeling -- 7.1.Continuous-Time, Conserved Modeling -- 7.1.1.Introduction -- 7.1.2.Fundamentals -- 7.1.3.Procedure for Model Creation -- 7.1.4.Electrical Domain -- 7.1.5.Thermal System Modeling -- 7.1.6.Magnetic System Modeling -- 7.1.7.Electromagnetic System Modeling -- 7.1.8.Mechanical System Modeling -- 7.1.9.Fluidic Systems -- 7.1.10.Optical Systems -- Conclusion -- References -- ch. 8 Event-Based Modeling -- 8.1.Event-Based Modeling -- 8.1.1.Introduction -- 8.1.2.Practical Issues -- 8.1.3.Digital Logic Modeling -- 8.1.4.Harsh Realities -- 8.1.5.Sampled Data Systems (Z-domain) -- Conclusion -- ch. 9 Fast Analog Modeling -- 9.1.Introduction -- 9.2.Averaged Modeling -- 9.2.1.Introduction -- 9.2.2.An Example Switching Power Supply: The Buck Converter -- 9.2.3.Modeling a Buck Converter Using a "real" MOSFET Model -- 9.2.4.Modeling a Buck Converter Using an "ideal" MOSFET Model -- Switch -- 9.2.5.Modeling a Buck Converter Using State Space Modeling Techniques -- 9.2.6.Modeling a Buck Converter Using an Averaged Switch Model -- 9.2.7.Summary of Averaged Modeling Techniques -- 9.3.Fast Analog Modeling -- 9.3.1.Introduction -- 9.3.2.Rationale -- Why Would We Do This? -- 9.3.3.Event-based Analog Modeling -- 9.3.4.Non-Linear Modeling -- 9.3.5.Assertion-based Testing -- 9.4.Finite-Difference Modeling -- 9.4.1.Introduction -- 9.4.2.Description of Approach -- 9.4.3.Example 9.1 -- Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- ch. 10 Model-Based Optimization Techniques -- 10.1.Introduction -- 10.2.Overview of Optimization Methods -- 10.2.1.Univariate Search Methods -- 10.2.2.Simulated Annealing -- 10.2.3.Genetic Algorithms -- 10.2.4.Multi-Objective Optimization -- 10.2.5.NSGA-II -- 10.2.6.Pareto-Based Optimization -- 10.2.7.Particle Swarm Optimization -- 10.2.8.Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm -- 10.2.9.Summary of Optimization Techniques -- 10.3.Case Study: Optimizing Magnetic Material Model Parameters -- 10.3.1.Introduction -- 10.3.2.Magnetic Material Model Optimization Procedure -- 10.3.3.Comparison of Optimization Methods -- 10.3.4.Statistical Analysis of Optimization Methods -- 10.3.5.Multiple Loop Optimization -- 10.3.6.Outline of Minor Loop Modeling using Turning Points -- 10.3.7.Testing the Modified Jiles-Atherton Model Behavior -- Conclusion -- References -- ch. 11 Statistical and Stochastic Modeling -- 11.1.Introduction -- 11.2.Fundamentals of Noise -- 11.2.1.Definitions -- 11.2.2.Calculating the Effect of Noise in a Circuit -- 11.2.3.Power Spectral Density of Noise -- 11.2.4.Types of Noise -- 11.2.5.Thermal Noise -- 11.2.6.Modeling and Simulation of Noise -- 11.2.7.Summary of Noise Modeling -- 11.3.Statistical Modeling -- 11.3.1.Introduction -- 11.3.2.Basic Statistical Behavior -- 11.3.3.Modeling Distributions -- 11.3.4.How to Interpret Variation in Models -- 11.3.5.Statistical Simulation Methods -- Monte Carlo -- 11.3.6.Random Numbers and "Seed" -- 11.3.7.Practical Statistical Simulation -- 11.3.8.Establishing the Relationship Between Component and Performance Variation -- 11.3.9.Improving the Circuit Yield Based on Simulation -- Conclusion -- References -- SECTION 3 Design Methods -- ch. 12 Design Flow -- 12.1.Introduction -- 12.2.Requirements and Specifications -- 12.2.1.Executable Specifications -- 12.3.Initial Design -- First Cut -- 12.3.1.Design Partitioning and Reuse -- 12.4.Detailed Design -- 12.4.1.Second-Order Effects -- 12.4.2.Focusing on Interfaces and Design Complexity -- 12.5.Optimal Design -- 12.6.Chip Integration and Verification -- Conclusion -- References -- ch. 13 Complex Electronic System Design Example -- 13.1.Introduction -- 13.2.Key Requirements -- 13.3.Top Level Model and Chip Architecture -- 13.3.1.Chip Architecture -- 13.3.2.Specification Definition and Capture -- 13.3.3.RF Section Design -- 13.3.4.Baseband Analog Design -- 13.3.5.Digital Core Design -- 13.3.6.Summary -- 13.4.Initial Design -- First Cut -- 13.4.1.An Introduction to Design Partitioning and Reuse -- 13.4.2.Initial Design Partition -- 13.4.3.Models and Levels -- 13.4.4.RF System -- Level 0 Blocks -- 13.4.5.Baseband Analog Blocks -- 13.4.6.Digital Blocks -- 13.4.7.Integration of Level 0 Executable Specifications -- 13.4.8.Summary of Level 0 Modeling -- 13.5.Detailed Design -- 13.5.1.Introduction -- 13.5.2.RF Detailed Design -- 13.5.3.Baseband Analog -- 13.5.4.Digital Blocks -- 13.5.5.Integration of Level 1 Executable Specifications -- 13.5.6.Summary of Level 1 Modeling -- 13.6.Bringing It All Together.
Resumen: Complete guide to methods, techniques and technologies of model-based engineering design for developing robust electronic systemsGives a toolbox of methods and models to choose from for the task at hand supported by numerous examples of how to put them into practiceShows how to adopt the methods using numerous industrial examples in the context of integrated circuit design In the electronics industry today consumer demand for devices with hyper-connectivity and mobility has resulted in the development of a complete system on a chip (SoC). Using the old 'rule of thumb' design methods of the past is no longer feasible for these new complex electronic systems. To develop highly successful systems that meet the requirements and quality expectations of customers, engineers now need to use a rigorous, model-based approach in their designs. This book provides the definitive guide to the techniques, methods and technologies for electronic systems engineers, embedded systems engineers, and hardware and software engineers to carry out model- based electronic system design, as well as for students of IC systems design. Based on the authors' considerable industrial experience, the book shows how to implement the methods in the context of integrated circuit design flows. Complete guide to methods, techniques and technologies of model-based engineering design for developing robust electronic systems. Written by world experts in model-based design who have considerable industrial experience.Shows how to adopt the methods using numerous industrial examples in the context of integrated circuit design.
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Colección de Libros Electrónicos TK7895 .E42 W55 2012 (Navegar estantería) 1 No para préstamo 380407-2001

Complete guide to methods, techniques and technologies of model-based engineering design for developing robust electronic systemsGives a toolbox of methods and models to choose from for the task at hand supported by numerous examples of how to put them into practiceShows how to adopt the methods using numerous industrial examples in the context of integrated circuit design In the electronics industry today consumer demand for devices with hyper-connectivity and mobility has resulted in the development of a complete system on a chip (SoC). Using the old 'rule of thumb' design methods of the past is no longer feasible for these new complex electronic systems. To develop highly successful systems that meet the requirements and quality expectations of customers, engineers now need to use a rigorous, model-based approach in their designs. This book provides the definitive guide to the techniques, methods and technologies for electronic systems engineers, embedded systems engineers, and hardware and software engineers to carry out model- based electronic system design, as well as for students of IC systems design. Based on the authors' considerable industrial experience, the book shows how to implement the methods in the context of integrated circuit design flows. Complete guide to methods, techniques and technologies of model-based engineering design for developing robust electronic systems. Written by world experts in model-based design who have considerable industrial experience.Shows how to adopt the methods using numerous industrial examples in the context of integrated circuit design.

Description based on print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Machine generated contents note: SECTION 1 Fundamentals for Model-Based Engineering -- ch. 1 Overview of Model-Based Engineering -- 1.1.Introduction -- 1.2.Multiple Facets of Modeling -- 1.3.Hierarchical Design -- 1.4.Partitioning -- 1.5.Specifications -- 1.6.Keys and Barriers to Adoption of Model-Based Engineering -- Conclusions -- ch. 2 The Design and Verification Process -- 2.1.Introduction to the Design Process -- 2.2.Validation, Verification, and Requirements -- 2.3.The Design and Verification Process -- 2.4.System/Functional Level: Executable Specification -- 2.5.Architectural Level -- 2.6.Implementation Level -- 2.7.Model-Based Engineering -- A Winning Approach -- ch. 3 Design Analysis -- 3.1.Introduction -- 3.2.Manual Analysis -- 3.2.1.Hand Calculations -- 3.2.2.Emulation, Experimentation, and Prototyping -- 3.3.Computer Simulation -- 3.3.1.Simulation Algorithms -- 3.3.4.Practical Issues -- Summary -- Conclusion -- References and Further Reading -- ch. 4 Modeling of Systems -- 4.1.Modeling in the Context of Design -- 4.2.Modeling Hierarchy -- 4.2.1.Hierarchy Concepts -- 4.2.2.Partitioning -- 4.3.Fundamentals of Modeling -- 4.3.1.Definition of a Model -- 4.3.2.Representing Model Variables -- 4.3.3.Representing Model Behavior -- 4.3.4.Representing Model Structure -- 4.3.5.Analog Connections -- 4.3.6.Discrete Connections -- 4.3.7.Generic Versus Component Models -- 4.3.8.Models and Effects -- 4.3.9.Conservation of Energy -- 4.3.10.Branches -- 4.4.Specific Modeling Techniques -- 4.4.1.Introduction -- 4.4.2.Behavioral Modeling Using HDLs -- 4.4.3.Behavioral Modeling Using Macromodeling -- 4.4.4.Structure in Behavioral Modeling -- 4.4.5.Signal Flow Models -- 4.4.6.Analog Conserved Models -- 4.4.7.Discrete Models -- 4.4.8.Event-Based Models -- 4.4.9.Mixed-Signal Boundaries -- 4.5.Forms of Representation -- 4.5.1.HDLs -- 4.5.2.C and System-C -- 4.5.3.System Level Modeling: Matlab -- 4.5.4.System Level Modeling: UML -- 4.6.Modeling Tools -- 4.6.1.Bottom-Up Tools -- 4.6.2.Top-Down Modeling Tools -- 4.6.3.Graphical Modeling -- 4.7.Future Proofing -- 4.7.1.Common Frameworks -- 4.7.2.Libraries -- 4.7.3.Standards -- 4.7.4.Language Independence -- 4.7.5.Graphical Representation -- Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- SECTION 2 Modeling Approaches -- ch. 5 Graphical Modeling -- 5.1.Introduction -- 5.2.Modeling on Top of Languages -- 5.3.Model Abstraction -- 5.4.Getting started with ModLyng -- 5.5.Creating a Simple Model -- 5.6.Libraries and Models -- 5.7.Effects and Models -- 5.8.Hierarchical Models -- Using the Schematic Editor -- 5.9.Test Benches and Model Validation -- 5.10.Examples -- 5.1.1.Example 5.1 -- 5.1.2.Example 5.2 -- Conclusion -- Appendix -- Reference -- Further Reading -- ch. 6 Block Diagram Modeling and System Analysis -- 6.1.Introduction -- 6.2.Signal Flow Modeling -- 6.3.State Machines -- 6.3.1.Finite State Machines -- 6.3.2.State Transition Diagrams -- 6.3.3.Algorithmic State Machines -- 6.4.Algorithmic Models -- 6.4.1.Introduction -- 6.4.2.System-C -- 6.5.Transfer Function Modeling -- 6.5.1.Introduction -- 6.5.2.Transfer Function Modeling Example -- 6.5.3.State Space Modeling -- Conclusion -- ch. 7 Multiple Domain Modeling -- 7.1.Continuous-Time, Conserved Modeling -- 7.1.1.Introduction -- 7.1.2.Fundamentals -- 7.1.3.Procedure for Model Creation -- 7.1.4.Electrical Domain -- 7.1.5.Thermal System Modeling -- 7.1.6.Magnetic System Modeling -- 7.1.7.Electromagnetic System Modeling -- 7.1.8.Mechanical System Modeling -- 7.1.9.Fluidic Systems -- 7.1.10.Optical Systems -- Conclusion -- References -- ch. 8 Event-Based Modeling -- 8.1.Event-Based Modeling -- 8.1.1.Introduction -- 8.1.2.Practical Issues -- 8.1.3.Digital Logic Modeling -- 8.1.4.Harsh Realities -- 8.1.5.Sampled Data Systems (Z-domain) -- Conclusion -- ch. 9 Fast Analog Modeling -- 9.1.Introduction -- 9.2.Averaged Modeling -- 9.2.1.Introduction -- 9.2.2.An Example Switching Power Supply: The Buck Converter -- 9.2.3.Modeling a Buck Converter Using a "real" MOSFET Model -- 9.2.4.Modeling a Buck Converter Using an "ideal" MOSFET Model -- Switch -- 9.2.5.Modeling a Buck Converter Using State Space Modeling Techniques -- 9.2.6.Modeling a Buck Converter Using an Averaged Switch Model -- 9.2.7.Summary of Averaged Modeling Techniques -- 9.3.Fast Analog Modeling -- 9.3.1.Introduction -- 9.3.2.Rationale -- Why Would We Do This? -- 9.3.3.Event-based Analog Modeling -- 9.3.4.Non-Linear Modeling -- 9.3.5.Assertion-based Testing -- 9.4.Finite-Difference Modeling -- 9.4.1.Introduction -- 9.4.2.Description of Approach -- 9.4.3.Example 9.1 -- Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- ch. 10 Model-Based Optimization Techniques -- 10.1.Introduction -- 10.2.Overview of Optimization Methods -- 10.2.1.Univariate Search Methods -- 10.2.2.Simulated Annealing -- 10.2.3.Genetic Algorithms -- 10.2.4.Multi-Objective Optimization -- 10.2.5.NSGA-II -- 10.2.6.Pareto-Based Optimization -- 10.2.7.Particle Swarm Optimization -- 10.2.8.Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm -- 10.2.9.Summary of Optimization Techniques -- 10.3.Case Study: Optimizing Magnetic Material Model Parameters -- 10.3.1.Introduction -- 10.3.2.Magnetic Material Model Optimization Procedure -- 10.3.3.Comparison of Optimization Methods -- 10.3.4.Statistical Analysis of Optimization Methods -- 10.3.5.Multiple Loop Optimization -- 10.3.6.Outline of Minor Loop Modeling using Turning Points -- 10.3.7.Testing the Modified Jiles-Atherton Model Behavior -- Conclusion -- References -- ch. 11 Statistical and Stochastic Modeling -- 11.1.Introduction -- 11.2.Fundamentals of Noise -- 11.2.1.Definitions -- 11.2.2.Calculating the Effect of Noise in a Circuit -- 11.2.3.Power Spectral Density of Noise -- 11.2.4.Types of Noise -- 11.2.5.Thermal Noise -- 11.2.6.Modeling and Simulation of Noise -- 11.2.7.Summary of Noise Modeling -- 11.3.Statistical Modeling -- 11.3.1.Introduction -- 11.3.2.Basic Statistical Behavior -- 11.3.3.Modeling Distributions -- 11.3.4.How to Interpret Variation in Models -- 11.3.5.Statistical Simulation Methods -- Monte Carlo -- 11.3.6.Random Numbers and "Seed" -- 11.3.7.Practical Statistical Simulation -- 11.3.8.Establishing the Relationship Between Component and Performance Variation -- 11.3.9.Improving the Circuit Yield Based on Simulation -- Conclusion -- References -- SECTION 3 Design Methods -- ch. 12 Design Flow -- 12.1.Introduction -- 12.2.Requirements and Specifications -- 12.2.1.Executable Specifications -- 12.3.Initial Design -- First Cut -- 12.3.1.Design Partitioning and Reuse -- 12.4.Detailed Design -- 12.4.1.Second-Order Effects -- 12.4.2.Focusing on Interfaces and Design Complexity -- 12.5.Optimal Design -- 12.6.Chip Integration and Verification -- Conclusion -- References -- ch. 13 Complex Electronic System Design Example -- 13.1.Introduction -- 13.2.Key Requirements -- 13.3.Top Level Model and Chip Architecture -- 13.3.1.Chip Architecture -- 13.3.2.Specification Definition and Capture -- 13.3.3.RF Section Design -- 13.3.4.Baseband Analog Design -- 13.3.5.Digital Core Design -- 13.3.6.Summary -- 13.4.Initial Design -- First Cut -- 13.4.1.An Introduction to Design Partitioning and Reuse -- 13.4.2.Initial Design Partition -- 13.4.3.Models and Levels -- 13.4.4.RF System -- Level 0 Blocks -- 13.4.5.Baseband Analog Blocks -- 13.4.6.Digital Blocks -- 13.4.7.Integration of Level 0 Executable Specifications -- 13.4.8.Summary of Level 0 Modeling -- 13.5.Detailed Design -- 13.5.1.Introduction -- 13.5.2.RF Detailed Design -- 13.5.3.Baseband Analog -- 13.5.4.Digital Blocks -- 13.5.5.Integration of Level 1 Executable Specifications -- 13.5.6.Summary of Level 1 Modeling -- 13.6.Bringing It All Together.

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